Monday, December 22, 2014

News, Cairo: Egyptian Museum tests public's response to Pharaonic sound and light Show

When night falls on the Egyptian Museum, its countless archaeological jewels disappear into the sepulchral darkness, but now a handful of lucky pieces will remain visible in the dark for at least a few days thanks to the museum's experimental sound and light show. In front of the museum, located on Tahrir Square, a large group of visitors watch as the statues of Pharaohs glow in the dark. EFE/ BELEN DELGADO.

Cairo (EFE).- When night falls on the Egyptian Museum, its countless archaeological jewels disappear into the sepulchral darkness, but now a handful of lucky pieces will remain visible in the dark for at least a few days thanks to the museum's experimental sound and light show.

In front of the museum, located on Tahrir Square, a large group of visitors watch as the statues of Pharaohs glow in the dark. As the anxious crowd enters, they journey back in time to the Old Kingdom (2686 -2181 BC.) when the majestic pyramids of Giza were built, and magnificent Memphis was Egypt's capital.

A faint orange light illuminates the granite colossus of Ramses II (1279-1213 BC), which welcomes visitors as recorded voices in Arabic (and later in English) narrate stories taken from ancient Egyptian civilization. Camera in hand, the visitors follow a pathway of lights that takes them to four of the museum's galleries.

Iman Masoud, a student of Egyptology, confided to Efe that this was "one of the most unique and interesting experiences" of her life, and that walking through the Egyptian Museum at night makes her hands and legs tremble. "Nobody pays much attention to many of these kings, even in the morning, even when tourists visit, so imagine being with them at a time like this", Masoud said and added that she considered such initiatives a "step forward" for Egypt.

Given the crowds of people and the amount of artifacts Masoud complains of the scant time for contemplation available in the rush to get a close-up view of the illuminated artifacts, which occupy a small part of the museum. Maybe that's why visitors will not see relics from ancient Egyptians with a greater hold on the popular imagination such Nefertiti, Akhenaten and Hatshepsut.

Even Masoud said that she had expected "something different". Among the artifacts on display is the statue of King Amenhotep III (1390-1353 BC) and the dwarf Seneb, who is sitting with his family and, despite his physical defects, became an important official of the V Dynasty.

But there is no light show to highlight the magnificent treasures of Tutankhamen and other well-known items among the Egyptian Museum's 160,000 pieces that span 5,000 years of the country's history in this nineteenth-century museum designed by Marcel Dourgnon.

The Egyptian Museum's director, Mahmoud Al-Halwagi told Efe that this was a trial show, set to last three days, to analyze the public's response. "According to the results, similar shows could be presented." This approach, says Dr. Al-Halwagi, seeks to "send a message to the world that Egypt is a country of peace and civilization, a safe place within the Middle East", Dr. al-Halwagi says.

1 comment:


  1. Yes, there are so many attractive things to see at the Egyptian museum. The status and the figure of the old traditions are so beautiful at the Egyptian museum. Anybody can know more about Egypt culture after seeing the museum. The pyramids of Giza, Luxor Temples and Nile cruise are another attraction of Egypt. Really the beauty, the nature, the privacy and the adventure of Egypt will make you want to go back again.

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