Showing posts with label National Museum of Egyptian Civilization. Show all posts
Showing posts with label National Museum of Egyptian Civilization. Show all posts

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Cairo: 9 Stunning Photos of the Newly Opened National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation

The newly opened museum is located in the heart of Al Fustat, housing between its walls 50,000 artefacts and the ancient natural lake of Ain Basira.

The newly inaugurated National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) was added to Egypt's long list of exceptional museums last week. 

The museum is located in the ancient Fustat city, the location of the original city of Cairo, behind the famous Amr Ibn El Aas Mosque, according to the Museum's recently launched Facebook page.

The 25-acre state-of-the-art establishment, which just opened to the public last Wednesday, is designed by Egyptian architect El Ghazzali Kosseiba. It is currently showcasing 50,000 historical pieces that narrate the development of Egyptian civilization since the dawn of time. 

It also includes on its premises the ancient Ain Basira natural lake.

Entry and photography is free for everyone until the end of February, after which entry will be set at EGP 30 for Egyptians and EGP 60 for foreigners. 

Here are some stunning pictures from the opening of the museum.
Check out the NMEC on Facebook.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Short Story: The NMEC Opens in Cairo

Model of a weaving workshop
A temporary exhibition on the development of Egyptian crafts through the ages is marking the soft opening of the new National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Cairo. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Overlooking the Ain Al-Sira Lake in the heart of Egypt’s first Islamic capital of Al-Fustat stands the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) with its pyramid-shaped roof. After six years of delay due to budgetary constraints in the aftermath of the 25 January Revolution, the NMEC was partially inaugurated this week with the opening of a temporary exhibition relating the history and development of Egyptian crafts through the ages.

As Al-Ahram Weekly went to press Prime Minister Sherif Ismail was scheduled to officially inaugurate the exhibition along with UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova and Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany. Although the work at the NMEC has been proceeding according to the schedule drawn up with UNESCO in 2002 when the foundation stone was laid, construction was put on hold after the revolution.

The museum was originally to be opened in July 2011. Owing to the revolution and funding problems, the opening was delayed. Over the past six years work proceeded slowly, but by 2014 all the construction work had been completed, including the galleries, corridors and exhibition sections as well as labs and storage galleries. Despite still showing some concrete underlay, the building’s floors and staircases are now encased in grey marble and the lighting and security systems all installed.

 A crescent necklace
However, budgetary issues have still prevented the total completion of the museum and its opening to the public. To overcome such obstacles, El-Enany suggested creating a temporary exhibition hall to put on show some of the museum’s planned exhibits to encourage tourism to the NMEC and provide the required funds to open the whole museum.

Over the last six months work on the two levels hosting the temporary exhibition “Egypt’s Crafts through the Ages” has been at full swing to meet the opening deadline. Workers have been organising artefacts inside showcases, while others have been inserting graphics on the theme of the exhibition design. Curators have been fixing labels on each display.

“I am very happy and proud to say that a part of my dream has now come true,” El-Enany told the Weekly, referring to this week’s partial opening. He added that between 2014 and 2016 he had been honoured to have been the supervisor of the NMEC project.

“In this capacity, I have seen first-hand the hard work and dedication of the museum staff and the ministry employees in making the museum’s debut exhibition a reality and a successful one at that. I take this opportunity to thank them for all their hard work,” El-Enany said, explaining that the newly opened exhibition was only a sampler of many more exciting endeavours to come.

“I hope every visitor will enjoy the exhibition and stay tuned to all of the NMEC’s future projects,” he said. The exhibition, El-Enany added, embodied what the NMEC as a museum and an institution aims to highlight: the material culture of a long-standing, diverse and advanced civilisation. It reflects both the continuity of traditions and the innovation of technologies in Egypt.

 Mabrouk and El-Enany inspecting the latest work at the exhibition hall before
 the opening
El-Enany said that the chosen crafts for the new exhibition were particularly relevant to the museum’s surrounding area, which has long been a hub of woodworking, textile production, jewellery making and pottery manufacturing. “Although the inauguration marks the opening of a single temporary exhibition to the public, the NMEC is a much larger entity than that, with rich galleries covering a plethora of themes in addition to being an extensive scientific research centre and cultural hub,” El-Enany said.

He announced that in order to celebrate the NMEC’s soft opening, the museum would offer admission to visitors free of charge beginning on 16 February and continuing through the end of the month. Photographs and videos for TV channels would be free of charge in the same period, he said.

“Craft production in Egypt has a long and rich history that over time has been continuously refined, incorporating new techniques and raw materials to create a treasure trove of exquisite masterpieces, many of which survive to this day,” Mahmoud Mabrouk, the exhibition designer, told the Weekly.

He said that the choice of crafts for the first temporary exhibition held at the NMEC boded well, with the location of the museum in Al-Fustat being known for its rich tradition of crafts. The area around the museum hosts a centuries-old pottery production community, and pottery producers and vendors line the main streets leading to the Museum.... READ MORE.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

News, Cairo: National Museum of Egyptian Civilization Opens Temporary Exhibit, Free Admission

The museum's soft-opening will showcase "Crafts and Industries through the Ages" in Egypt, offering free admission 16-28 February. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Under the name "Crafts and Industries through the Ages" the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) is set to open its first temporary exhibition Wednesday evening, showcasing the history of four crafts in Egypt: clay, jewellery, textiles and wood. The opening will be attended by UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova.

On a tour of the exhibition Monday, Egypt's Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany told Ahram Online that to celebrate the NMEC's soft opening the museum will offer free admission from 16 through 28 February. Mahmoud Mabrouk, the exhibition's designer, said the museum will showcase a collection of 400 artefacts selected from Cairo's Egyptian Museum, Coptic Museum, Museum of Islamic Civilization and Al-Manial Palace Museum, as well as Alexandria's Jewellery Museum and NMEC storage.

Final preparations for Wednesday's opening are currently underway. "The exhibition will bring to life the continuation and development of ancient crafts into modern times through graphics, multimedia electronic guides and a documentary screening," Mabrouk said.

The most important artefacts, Mabrouk said, will be a collection of prehistoric clay pots, the royal chair of Hetep-Heres, mother of King Khufu, and a small ancient Egyptian stool carved from 120 wooden pieces. A Qabbati robe textile and set of Islamic doors decorated with foliage and geometric designs with ivory are also among the distinguished items to be displayed, along with jewellery from Siwa, Nubia, Upper and Lower Egypt.

Saeed Mahrous, NMEC Supervisor-General told Ahram Online "This exhibition is a step toward the NMEC’s third and final stage along the road to opening; it includes the museum’s 23,000 square metre exhibition hall.” “The exhibition will be organised by the chronology and geography of the artefacts,” Saeed added.

Plans to create the NMEC began in 1982 and construction finished in 2009. In 2000 a location on Lake Ain Al-Sira in Fustat was selected and in 2002 the large, square foundation stone — the platform of the building's stylised pyramid design — was installed.

When it opens fully to the public, the museum will display a collection of 50,000 artefacts from different eras in Egyptian history from the pre-dynastic through the modern age. The site houses a number of high-tech storage galleries, as well as a state-of-the-art security system, much like its counterparts the British Museum in London and the Louvre in Paris.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Our Treasures Abroad, Brussels: 35,000 Year-Old Axe to Return to Egypt After Studies

The Returned Axe From Belgium
The Louvain University in Belgium handed over a 35,000 year-old axe to the Egyptian Embassy in Brussels after studies. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

After the completion of archaeological and scientific studies, the Louvein University in Belgium handed over a 35,000 year-old axe to the Egyptian Embassy in Brussels. The axe will arrive in Egypt within days.

Shaaban Abdel Gawad, the supervisor-general of Antiquities Repatriation Department, said the axe is carved in stone and was discovered by the Louvain mission along with a human skeleton in Nazlet Khater archaeological site in Sohag in Upper Egypt.

The Luvein mission took both the skeleton and the axe to Belgium for studies. The skeleton returned to Egypt in August 2015. Abdel Gawad said that the axe is one of the oldest skeletons ever found in Egypt.

It goes back to the Old archaic era around 35,000 years ago. It also shows the development of human species that lived in Egypt throughout different eras. 

Abdel Gawad suggested that the skeleton and the axe be put on show at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Fustat.

Saturday, December 24, 2016

News, Cairo: Work Continues at National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation Ahead of January Soft Opening

Renovation work is underway at the temporary exhibition hall at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC), which overlooks Ain El-Sira lake in Fustat, ahead of the museum’s soft opening day scheduled for mid January. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany embarked on a tour on Tuesday around the different sections of the hall to inspect the latest work. During his tour, El-Enany told Ahram Online that the soft opening, scheduled for 10 January, includes the opening of the temporary exhibition hall, which will have on display an exhibition on handicrafts and Egyptian industries along the span of history under the title “Crafts and Industries through the Ages.”

The soft opening will also include the inauguration of the service area, which includes a cinema, theatre and a cafeteria. Saeed Mahrous, supervisor-general of the NMEC, told Ahram Online that the exhibition will have on show a collection of some 400 artefacts showcasing the traditional Egyptian techniques used in the making of clay, jewellery, textiles and wood carvings.

Mahrous says the objects were chosen from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir, the Coptic museum in Old Cairo, the Museum of Islamic Art in Babul Khalq, as well as the Textiles Museum in Al-Muiz Street, the Alexandria Jewellery Museum and Al-Fustat store galleries.

The exhibition will also illuminate the continuation and development of ancient crafts into modern times. “This exhibition is a step towards NMEC’s third and final stage along the road to opening, which includes the museum’s 23,000 square metre exhibition hall,” concluded El-Enany. “The exhibition... will be organised by the chronology and geography of the artefacts,” said Saeed, adding that a multimedia electronic guide will be available to visitors.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

News, Cairo: Transported Porcelain Artifacts are not damaged as Rumored - Egyptian Antiquities Ministry

Nevine El- Aref: Ministry of Antiquities asserted in a press release on Tuesday that the recently transported 38 artifacts o the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) are safe and sound and were not damaged as rumoured.

Mahrous Saeed, supervisor general of the NMEC, told Ahram Online that the pieces were transported safely from the Manial Palace in Cairo and are now stored in the NMEC gallery, which is equipped according by state-of-the-art technology.

“The porcelain objects are safe and sound in the NMEC,” asserted Saeed, adding that the pieces include lamps and pots from the 19th-century Mohamed Aly family era.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

News, Giza: Egypt's Grand Museum, National Museum of Egyptian Civilization to Have Separate Management

The Grand Egyptian Museum and the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization to become independent under supervision of antiquities ministry. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Prime Minister Sherif Ismail issued a ministerial decree to establish two independent General Authorities for the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) and the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) under the supervision of the antiquities ministry.

Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany said the decree states that every authority would have its own board of trustees composed of a group of Egyptian and prominent international public figures with experience in the field. 

Every board would draft the museum's general policies, setting up a work programme and managing the museum's budget through studying the grants, donations and gifts provided from international, regional and local parties, within the articles of law and regulations that organise them. 

The board of trustees, he added, would also appoint the museum director and his two assistants.

GEM's Supervisor General Tarek Tawfik described the decree as ideal because it would facilitate administrative work in both museums as well as decrease its bureaucracy.

He went on to say that the board of trustees would push the work forward to make the dream of both museums come true.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

News, Cairo Egypt and UNESCO Discuss Fustat Civilisation Museum

Egypt's minister of antiquities meets with UNESCO representatives and others to discuss the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation, partially completed but largely on hold since the 2011 revolution. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany met on Wednesday with representatives of the UNESCO office in Egypt and a special international agency to discuss preliminary suggestions on making use of the visitors centre of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) in Fustat, as well as its cultural and commercial sections.

Mahrous Saeed, supervisor general of the NMEC, said that UNESCO's Egypt office asked a special international agency to carry out a feasibility study on getting the best use out of the NMEC visitor centre as well as finding additional finance to restart suspended work on the museum.

The cultural section of NMEC houses a 332-seat cinema, a 486-seat theatre, and lecture and conference halls equipped with state-of-the-art projectors, media, sound and lighting systems. The commercial section has 42 shops, cafeterias and restaurants.

The museum's main building, overlooking Ain Al-Sira Lake in the heart of Egypt’s first Islamic capital, Fustat, is near completion, including galleries, corridors and exhibition sections. Work was all but halted in the aftermath of the 2011 revolution due to budgetary shortfalls.

Selection of the site for the NMEC was made in 2000. In 2002, the pyramid-shaped foundation stone of the building was laid, and in 2004 the first phase of the project was completed.

An extensive pre-building inspection was carried out to determine if any ruins or antiquities lay buried below ground. An up-to-date storage space, similar to that of the Louvre Museum in Paris and the British Museum in London was built on site. This is the first time that such a storage facility has been built in Egypt and includes a high-tech security system that is directly connected to the police commissariat. A laboratory to restore pieces in the museum’s collection is also among the achievements of the first phase.

The second phase started in 2007 but has not yet completed. Tarek Al-Nagaawy, the NMEC project’s engineer, told Al-Ahram Weekly that work at the museum has been slow, but the team has completed the building’s commercial and cultural section. The museum’s glass pyramid-shaped roof will display a multimedia show of the different eras of Egyptian civilisation.

Thursday, August 4, 2016

News: Preparations For NMEC Temporary Exhibition in Full Swing

A collection of 38 ceramic pots from the modern era arrived safely to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization from the Mohamed Ali Palace in Manial. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany is to embark Thursday on an inspection tour of the halls of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) to follow up the latest work undertaken in a temporary exhibition that will soon be held in the museum's temporary exhibition hall.

Mahrous Saeed, Supervisor General of the NMEC, told Ahram Online that the NMEC is to organize a temporary exhibition entitled Handicrafts and Industries Along the Span of Time to show a collection of 400 artifacts carefully selected from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir; the Coptic Museum in Old Cairo, the Jewellery Museum in Alexandria and the Mohamed Ali Palace in Manial.

The objects that have been transported to the museum include of 38 coloured ceramic and porcelain pots, tea and coffee pots and vases from the modern era.

During his inspection tour, El-Enany is to meet with the museum's administration board and the company overseeing the project to follow up the latest updates and discuss any problems or concerns with the exhibition's progress.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

News, Cairo: A Collection of Artifacts Arrives at Egyptian Civilization Museum

Pre-Dynastic Engraving (Courtesy of the Ministry of Antiquities)
A collection of 13 stone engravings arrived to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation from Aswan. Written By/ Nevine El-Aref.

A collection of 13 stone engravings arrived at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation in Fustat, Giza on Wednesday evening from Al Shisha hill in Aswan.

Antiquities Minister Khaled El-Enany announced that the engravings have been very well preserved and would be subject to restoration and archeological documentation leading up to the museum’s official opening. 

The museum’s Supervisor-General Mahrous Saeed said that the engravings have been dated to pre-dynastic times except for one that is dated to the Middle Kingdom era. The latter engraving, Saeed explained, depicts King Senusert III standing and beating his arming who are bending before him.

A permanent exhibition hall is set to be inaugurated soon in the museum and will display an exhibition entitled “Handicrafts and Productions in ancient Egypt.”

The exhibition will display 429 artefacts relating to industrial development in ancient Egypt from pre-historic times through to the New Kingdom era.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

News, Cairo: National Museum of Egyptian Civilization Organizes First Exhibition

The temporary exhibition will showcase objects borrowed from a number of other museums. Written By / Nevine El-Aref.
Under the name "Crafts and Industries through the Ages" the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) is to open its first temporary exhibition in October.

Khaled El-Enani, NMEC director, told Ahram Online the exhibition will display some 400 artefacts showcasing the old techniques used in four Egyptian crafts: clay, jewelleries, textiles and wood.

He explains that the objects have been carefully selected from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Egyptian Museum, Coptic Museum, Museum of Islamic Civilization and Al-Manial Palace Museum, as well as Alexandria's Jewellery Museum.

The exhibition will also illuminate the continuation and development of the old crafts into modern times.

"This exhibition is a step towards NMEC third's and final stage along the road to opening, which includes using the museum’s 23,000 square metres of exhibition hall," concluded El-Enani.

Antiquities minister Mamdouh Eldamaty said the exhibition is a step on the right path, and the exhibition will be organised by the chronology and geography of the artefacts. A multi-media electronic guide will be available.

Sunday, June 14, 2015

News, Cairo: The NMEC receives its first batch of artifacts

The first batch of antiquities is to arrive to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization. Written by Nevine El-Aref.

limestone reliefs
The National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) received on Saturday the first batch of a treasured collection which will be put on display at the Museum's official inauguration in 2016.

The batch includes ten artifacts carefully selected from the store galleries of the Saqqara necropolis which show limestone reliefs engraved with scenes depicting the daily and religious life of ancient Egyptians as well as an 18th dynasty army leader before becoming a king.

Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty and the NMEC director general Khaled AL-Anani received the objects, with the former describing the batch as "a milestone towards the NMEC official inauguration."

Al-Anani told Ahram Online that the objects will be conserved and would remain in the NMEC galleries until its opening.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

New Opening, Cairo: The National Museum of Egyptian Civilization to open end of November 2014

The cultural section will include a theatre, state-of-the-art lecture halls and high-tech laboratories among others

Following a three-year hiatus, the cultural section of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC), located at the Al-Fustat area overlooking Ain Al-Sira Lake, is to open at the end of November, announced antiquities minister Mamdouh Eldamaty on Monday. The minister made his announcement during his tour around the museum's different sections to inspect the work being achieved to complete the long-awaited NMEC.

Khaled El-Enany director general of the NMEC told Ahram Online that the cultural section includes a two-story theatre and lecture and conference halls well equipped with state-of-the-art projectors, media, sound and lighting systems. A collection of 42 shops, cafeterias and restaurants with a serving capacity of 500 people will also be part of the section.

El-Enany explains that this section is to be open not only to announce to the world that the NMEC is on its way to see the light of day but also to create a source of fundraising in an attempt to spruce up the required work needed to complete the third and final phase of the project. He went on to say that the shops, cafeterias and restaurants would sell souvenirs, handicrafts, and books on topics such as history, arts, and archaeology. A parking lot with a capacity of 450 cars and 55 buses will also be built.

The NMEC's high-tech laboratories and storehouse are to be also inaugurated. The storehouse, El-Enany said, is the first to be built in Egypt and is similar to the ones at the Louvre in Paris and the British Museum in London.  The labs will be dedicated to the examination and restoration of human remains and organic materials.

The three-phase construction of the 33 feddans at NMEC started in 2002 by laying down its pyramid-shaped foundation stone. The first phase, which was completed in 2004, included the construction of the laboratories and storehouse. 

The second phase started immediately afterward and constructed the building itself as well as the cultural centre. According to the museum's timeline schedule the NMEC was meant to open in 2011 but was postponed as a result of the January revolution as tourism declined. In 2012 work resumed at the NMEC but at a slower pace, succeeding in completing the cultural section which is to be inaugurated to public in November.

The NMEC is to put a collection of 150,000 artefacts relating to Egypt's civilisations along the span of history on display. These artefacts were carefully selected from museums and archaeological sites in Egypt.  It will also house a set of monuments, among them are the Seboua Temple of Ramses II – now on Lake Nasser; a complete façade of a Fatimid sabil, two columns from King Djoser's temple at Saqqara, the collection of royal mummies, and the mummy of the ancient Egyptian artist Sanejem which is now on display at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square. The River Nile, handwriting, handicrafts, society and faith are the five main outdoor component themes of the new museum.
Source: Ahram Online